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Troll: a love story

Troll: A love story, by Johanna Sinisalo

A review.. Although this book is not perfect, I appreciated the troll character and its interaction with urban gay male culture and the way the protagonist slowly gets obsessed with the young cub. The protagonist had to research many fragments of troll culture and history to inform himself about his new foundling. This was interspersed between very short chapters.
At times this book was hilariously melodramatic and reached high farce.
I asked myself if that was intended to counter the advertising world Angel and Martes worked in. Apparently, Sinisalo wanted to bring the mythical and the humdrum worlds together, in interiors and apartments. A trolls’ world is outside, so I did enjoy this questioning of domesticating a wild animal, of getting at why they were coming to the edge of the cities, and of what it means to love something, even something bestial. However, placing these themes side by side with gay characters is questionable. Gays and queers are still compared to the bestial and charges of bestiality by the Christian right still occur. So I found this unsettling and not handled with enough political finesse. The writing was not poetic and was emotionally detached. But perhaps the Finnish is different and we are missing some of these subtleties in translation.

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h2o

Putting my feet in the water with the little fish and watching a pelican take off. Lucky to have Jawbone Flora and Fauna Reserve so close to the city, thriving amongst the western suburbs. I was surprised when I first came across this place at the back of large houses as it seemed like a hidden national park. Its condition can be explained by the fact that the land was isolated from development for over 80 years because it was a coastal rifle range. Now the Jawbone Marine Sanctuary protects all kinds of marine life. There is a saltmarsh area that has the largest occurrence of mangroves in Port Phillip Bay. This sanctuary is part of the Country of the Boonwurrung people, and I acknowledge their elders here.